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Captain America: The First Avenger

2011  124 MN


 6.5



Captain America: The First Avenger on IMDb
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Joe Johnston
  Director




During World War II, Steve Rogers is a sickly man from Brooklyn who's transformed into super-soldier Captain America to aid in the war effort. Rogers must stop the Red Skull – Adolf Hitler's ruthless head of weaponry, and the leader of an organization that intends to use a mysterious device of untold powers for world domination.

 Release Date

July 22, 2011

 Runtime

2h4m (124 min)

 Budget

$ 140,000,000

 Revenue

$ 370,569,774


 Top Billed Cast

 Chris Evans
 Steve Rogers / Captain America
 Hayley Atwell
 Peggy Carter
 Sebastian Stan
 James "Bucky" Barnes
 Tommy Lee Jones
 Col. Chester Phillips
 Hugo Weaving
 Johann Schmidt / Red Skull
 Dominic Cooper
 Howard Stark


 Written by

Christopher Markus Screenplay
Stephen McFeely Screenplay
Jane Wu Storyboard

 Tagline

When patriots become heroes

 Videos




 Cast

Chris Evans
  Steve Rogers / Captain America
Hayley Atwell
  Peggy Carter
Sebastian Stan
  James "Bucky" Barnes
Tommy Lee Jones
  Col. Chester Phillips
Hugo Weaving
  Johann Schmidt / Red Skull
Dominic Cooper
  Howard Stark
Stanley Tucci
  Abraham Erskine
Samuel L. Jackson
  Nick Fury
Toby Jones
  Dr. Arnim Zola
Neal McDonough
  Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan
Derek Luke
  Gabe Jones
Kenneth Choi
  Jim Morita
J.J. Feild
  James Montgomery Falsworth
Bruno Ricci
  Jacques Dernier
Lex Shrapnel
  Gilmore Hodge
Michael Brandon
  Senator Brandt
Martin Sherman
  Brandt's Aide
Natalie Dormer
  Private Lorraine
Oscar Pearce
  Search Team Leader
William Hope
  SHIELD Lieutenant
Nicholas Pinnock
  SHIELD Tech
Marek Oravec
  Jan
David Bradley
  Tower Keeper
Leander Deeny
  Barman
Sam Hoare
  Nervous Recruit
Simon Kunz
  4F Doctor
Kieran O'Connor
  Loud Jerk
Jenna Coleman
  Connie
Sophie Colquhoun
  Bonnie
Doug Cockle
  Young Doctor
Ben Batt
  Enlistment Office MP
Mollie Fitzgerald
  Stark Girl
Damon Driver
  Sergeant Duffy
David McKail
  Johann Schmidt's Artist
Amanda Walker
  Antique Store Owner
Richard Freeman
  SSR Doctor
Katherine Press
  Project Rebirth Nurse
Sergio Covino
  Kruger's Aide
Marcello Walton
  Undercover Bum
Anatole Taubman
  Roeder
Jan Pohl
  Hutter
Erich Redman
  Schneider
Rosanna Hoult
  The Star Spangled Singer
Naomi Slights
  The Star Spangled Singer
Kirsty Mather
  The Star Spangled Singer
Laura Haddock
  Autograph Seeker
James Payton
  'Adolph Hitler'
Ronan Raftery
  Army Heckler
Nick Hendrix
  Army Heckler
Luke Allen-Gale
  Army Heckler
Jack Gordon
  Army Heckler
Ben Uttley
  HYDRA Guard / HYDRA Pilot
Patrick Monckeberg
  Manager Velt
Amanda Righetti
  SHIELD Agent
Stan Lee
  General (uncredited)

 Crew


Alan Silvestri
  Original Music Composer
Rick Heinrichs
  Production Design
John Dexter
  Supervising Art Director
Priscilla John
  Casting
Reese Spensley
  Set Costumer
Sarah Halley Finn
  Casting
Joe Johnston
  Director
Joe Johnston
  Executive Producer
Shelly Johnson
  Director of Photography
Robert Dalva
  Editor
Anthony J. Ciccolini III
  ADR Editor
Christopher Markus
  Screenplay
Stephen McFeely
  Screenplay
Anna B. Sheppard
  Costume Design
Stan Lee
  Executive Producer
Kevin Feige
  Producer
Shannon Mills
  Sound Designer
Nigel Gostelow
  Executive Producer
Suzie F. Wiesmann
  Production Manager
Vincent Guisetti
  Foley Artist
Andy Nicholson
  Supervising Art Director
Jeffrey Ford
  Editor
Francine Segal
  Dialect Coach
Phil Harvey
  Art Direction
Randi Hiller
  Casting
Chris Lowe
  Supervising Art Director
David Lucarelli
  ADR Recordist
Louis D'Esposito
  Executive Producer
Alan Fine
  Executive Producer
David Maisel
  Executive Producer
Victoria Alonso
  Producer
John Bush
  Set Decoration
Albert Gasser
  Sound Effects Editor
Greg Zimmerman
  ADR Recordist
Stephen Hunter Flick
  Sound Designer
Jason Knox-Johnston
  Art Direction
Dean Clegg
  Art Direction
Lisa Westcott
  Makeup Designer
Mitchell Bell
  Producer
Stephen Broussard
  Producer
Richard Whelan
  Producer
Kiran Pallegadda
  First Assistant Editor
Jeff Muhlstock
  Steadicam Operator
Gian Ganziano
  Visual Effects Editor
Ken Crouch
  Costume Supervisor
Vincent Cirelli
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Jonathan Fawkner
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Phil Sims
  Art Direction
Randy L. Childs
  Construction Coordinator
Barry Gibbs
  Property Master
Martin Gaskell
  Sculptor
Katie Gabriel
  Art Department Coordinator
Darren Fitzsimons
  Sculptor
Florian Gellinger
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Richard Selway
  Assistant Art Director
Scott Millan
  Sound Re-Recording Mixer
Tyson Bidner
  Location Manager
Lisa Vick
  Script Supervisor
Mike Stassi
  Set Designer
Susan Dudeck
  ADR Editor
Patricia Klawonn
  Set Designer
Alessandro Cioffi
  VFX Supervisor
Jay Maidment
  Still Photographer
Steve Dent
  Stunt Coordinator
Helen Xenopoulos
  Assistant Art Director
Larry Kemp
  Dialogue Editor
Susie Allnutt
  Still Photographer
Thomas Nittmann
  Visual Effects Producer
Daniel P. Rosen
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Jon Johnson
  Sound Effects Editor
Craig Barron
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Ian Whiteford
  Greensman
John Higgins
  Lighting Technician
John Berri
  Visual Effects Editor
Barbara McDermott
  Music Editor
George Peters
  Camera Operator
Daniel Pagan
  Sound Designer
Richard Higham
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Sam Breckman
  Production Manager
Felix Crawshaw
  Visual Effects Producer
Cameron Sharp
  Visual Effects Editor
Ruben Malaret
  Publicist
John Marzano
  Helicopter Camera
Paul Stemmer
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Greg Steele
  ADR Mixer
Pamela Kahn
  Foley Artist
Brian Baverstock
  Transportation Coordinator
Howell Gibbens
  Supervising Sound Editor
Steve Griffith
  Visual Effects Producer
David Parker
  Sound Re-Recording Mixer
Cheryl Eckert
  Hairstylist
Linda D. Flowers
  Hairstylist
Shari Ratliff
  Art Department Coordinator
Monika Schellenberge
  Sculptor
Jean Harter
  Set Designer
Blake Maslin
  Greensman
Craig Whiteford
  Greensman
Jason W. Jennings
  Sound Designer
Suhail Kafity
  Sound Effects Editor
David A. Arnold
  Dialogue Editor
Lisa J. Levine
  ADR Editor
Beverly Austin
  Special Effects Coordinator
Jonathan Harb
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Aaron Rhodes
  Visual Effects Editor
Kosta Saric
  Visual Effects Editor
Kathy Siegel
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Rob Woiwod
  Visual Effects Editor
Christopher Townsend
  Visual Effects Supervisor
Melinka Thompson-Godoy
  Visual Effects Producer
Robert Pinnow
  Visual Effects Producer
Votch Levi
  CG Supervisor
Alexandra Daunt Watney
  Visual Effects Producer
Douglas Bloom
  CG Supervisor
Pete Bebb
  CG Supervisor
Thomas Baber
  CG Supervisor
Casey Allen
  VFX Supervisor
Pouyan Navid
  CG Supervisor
Pavel Pranevsky
  CG Supervisor
Matthew Sampson
  Stunt Coordinator
Pete Cavaciuti
  Camera Operator
Pete Cavaciuti
  Steadicam Operator
David Richert
  Camera Operator
Henry Tirl
  Camera Operator
Henry Tirl
  Steadicam Operator
Des Whelan
  Camera Operator
David Knox
  Additional Camera
Dan Riffel
  Gaffer
Kevin Edland
  Best Boy Electric
Wayne Leach
  Rigging Gaffer
Emma McCleave
  First Assistant Editor
Thomas Calderon
  First Assistant Editor
Brenda K. Wachel
  Script Supervisor
Ali James
  Location Manager
Kathryn Donovan
  Unit Publicist
Tom Crooke
  Location Manager
Emma Pill
  Location Manager
Chris O'Connell
  Visual Effects Editor
Kyle Rochlin
  Foley Mixer
Joe Dorn
  Supervising ADR Editor
Jane Wu
  Storyboard
Scott F. Johnston
  Visual Effects
Brian N. Bentley
  Compositors
Elizabeth Kenton
  Supervising Dialogue Editor
Brian Avery
  Stunts
Billy Theriot
  ADR Mixer
Jo McLaren
  Stunts
Mark Appleby
  ADR Mixer
Peter N. Brown
  Supervising Carpenter
Andy Park
  Conceptual Illustrator
Emmet O'Donnell
  ADR Recordist
Rick Marcus
  Utility Stunts


 Quotes

 New Quote

 Reviews


 New Review

Very good.
By Carry9 on January 6, 2019
 6

Very good.


A Vulnerable Steve Rogers
By Jack Anderson on January 6, 2019
 7

Let me start by saying it right away. I hate Captain America. The reason is quite simple. He's perfect. And in storytelling, perfect characters mean emptiness. The beauty is in the light that shines through the scars of the body and the soul. I thought that Captain America had no soul, and you know what? I was dead wrong.
I had seen Captain America in all the Marvel movies, except this one. In those films, he's perfect, always dead serious and at the end not much fun. In a sense, he's the perfect opposite to the wildly fun Iron Man.

And then, my friend Gruic gave me the spark to go back and watch the entire MCU from the beginning:
- Iron Man was fun!
- The Incredible Hulk had a good first part, but then was really average.
- Iron Man 2 was a disaster.
- Thor was a great surprise, as I expected a really bad film and saw quite the opposite.

So here comes Captain America: The First Avenger. Let me jump right to it. I loved it! It reminded me of the good old stories with Nazis performing with paranormal activities. In a way, this film is almost like a depiction of the video game Return to Castle Wolfenstein. It got the all package. Nazis, references to the Führer, great and stylish design, train heist, a scent of the 40's, fights in planes, you name it!

But let me start with the beginning.

The reason I hated Captain America so much is that he was perfect. You should have seen my face when I discovered him as a frail and small man at the beginning of that film. That was just brilliant, truly magnificent. It was so much fun, every frame was a delight to watch. I actually never learned what was the backstory of this character and how he actually became Captain America.
Suddenly, Captain America actually has a name, Steve Rogers. He's being bullied and you cannot not root for him. Because we always love seeing the little guys succeeding against the bullies. That's why we all love Back to the Future and Marty McFly going against big bullies.

Also, in this film, we actually never know if Captain America is immortal or not. Of course, from the beginning, we know he will reappear in the future (or actually in the present day), but throughout the film, we just see him as extremely strong, or even a step further (obviously, even the strongest person couldn't manage a shield like he does.) I think that was extremely clever, as I really physically hate watching immortal characters fighting each other on screen. This is more boring that watching a cloud moving.

I really liked the concept of providing only this power to a weak man, so that he would never forget where he came from. That really touched a chord in me and I think this is a concept you can duplicate on other areas of life as well.

Also, I was very surprised to see Hugo Weaving in that film. He is so talented to play bad guys, as we, once again, all loved him as the bad guy in The Matrix (I said The Matrix, I did not mention the sequels, all right?) And his red face, àla The Mask was pure evil and worked beautifully. The contrast with the white from his teeth (yeah, that may be an odd comment) was really great. That was the designer in me talking here. Moving on.

The look of the film is really great as well, and while I am sure I would not have gone this way if I was a producer on this film, I must admit that the modern look worked very well. It embeds quite nicely with the old touch and we still are able to breath this scent from the 40's - I'm talking about the 1940's, in case someone reads this review thirty years from now.

SUMMARY
So, overall, this is really a big action movie, without too much meat on the bone, but still very, very enjoyable. Therefore, I am really surprised to give it 7 out of 10. I was so sure to experience an awful film that I may raise the bar a little bit too much. Maybe I'll review it in a few years and will give it only a 6 or even a 5. But surely, I won't give a lower rating than this. Go, Cap!


xenocast

True to "Captain America," this is the modern (comic book) version of the All American movie. Good guys versus bad guys without a lot of ambiguity. _**NOTHING WRONG WITH THAT**_.

This movie is pretty much perfection for the genre. Entertaining A to Z story with high-end Hollywood professional movie making throughout.


Gimly

**This is a long form review initially published in 2011:**

Though it ran at over two hours, I did feel that it had plenty of room to go further than it did. I honestly felt like Red Skull could have had a film all to himself, and actually kind of suffered for making him as intriguing as he was.

Chris Evans was an interesting choice as the titular role of Captain America, given that he's already played American sweetheart Marvel Super Hero "The Human Torch" in _Fantastic 4_ and _Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer_. He didn't Oh-My-Gosh blow me away type-thing or what have you, but he was pretty great.

So far in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I'd slot Captain America clean in the middle. I liked _Iron Man_ and _Thor_ more, but _Iron Man 2_ and _The Incredible Hulk_ less. Marvel Studios stated that the movie they wanted to make was set in the 40's, even though the rest of Marvel Cinematic is modern-day. This was 100% the right move to make, why? Not because of the setting, aesthetics or direction, but because it's fuckin' smart. How do you have the world appreciate an Uncle-Sam loving upper-middle class white male military blindly-loyal patriot? You make him fight the God damn Nazis, that's how.

It may seem strange, but I actually enjoyed the opening of _Captain America_ the most, which he spends a a meek, asthmatic Steve Rogers, yet to undergo the Deus Ex Machina Super Serum. It really showed the best of Evans acting ability, as well as the writing of Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely whom together wrote _You Kill Me_ and The _The Chronicles of Narnia_ Trilogy.

I watched it in 3D, which was more bearable than usual. As the films of MCU progress, each of them becomes more and more a prequel to _The Avengers_, _Captain America_ being the most to date. Despite its almost-entire lack of _Avenger_ cameos, this more than previous films felt like a prequel for what's to come, which is not strictly speaking a good thing.

I had plenty of minor issues with _Captain America_, and though their was quite a number of them, all were minor, and ultimately, the only part of me that regrets watching it was the part that keeps thinking "My fucking God, I have to wait a YEAR before _Avengers_ comes out?!"

79%

-Gimly


PolyWogg

PLOT

Steve Rogers, a scrawny young man, wants to enlist in the US Army and go overseas to fight in WWII. But his size and health means his attempts at enlistment always end the same way -- a 4F rating. Until a scientist sees him and recruits him to try out for a special training program to create a super soldier.

WHAT I LIKED

The Marvel universe sticks pretty close to classic script with him being given a serum that jacks his body into super muscle mode. He's already brave and smart, so it would seem like a no-brainer to send him overseas? But the guy in charge of his training doesn't want him, he's just one man, so Rogers ends up doing public relations back home. And he is quite shocked that the men overseas don't react as positively when they see him as the crowds back home. I really enjoyed the way they handle the first battle scene for him, basically him figuring things out as he goes, a far cry from his battle-hardened approaches later.

I even liked his interactions with Agent Carter. I had thought it would be more subtle than it was, and I hoped we'd see a bit more of her operating on her own (after all, they gave her character a whole series on TV!), but she was second fiddle to the hero.

WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE

The challenge with a lot of American movies of the war is that it is as if they are the only actors in the war, no allies, just them, and that level of nationalistic narrowmindedness is a bit grating. That may be a small gripe when the show is called CAPTAIN AMERICA, not CAPTAIN OF WORKING WITH ALLIES, but still, it's annoying. I also was disappointed there wasn't a lot more on Red Skull. His history, his abilities, other pursuits, all of it was left basically unreferenced. Sure, some of it shows up elsewhere in the Marvel universe, but a bit more crosswalk would have been nice. I felt he really wasn't that well-fleshed out as the uber villain he could have been.

THE BOTTOM LINE / TWEET

As an origin story, it lacks pizazz


tmdb44006625

Definitely the most underrated of all the MCU films, Captain America: The First Avenger is a great war film done comic book style about a little guy making a big difference. Red Skull is one of the better villains simply because of how fantastic Hugo Weaving is. Peggy Carter is a great heroine and Hayley Atwell's performance is an absolute joy. Also, Tommy Lee Jones and Stanley Tucci light up the screen whenever they're on.

With strong action scenes, nicely developed characters, and seamless CGI, Captain America: The First Avenger is perfectly fine as a stand alone film. Shameful that so many audiences were just going out of obligation for The Avengers, because this movie has a lot to offer.


JPV852

Probably only my third time viewing and first in at least 8 years and while it's not great, I did find it to be pretty entertaining and Chris Evans embodies the role so well. Red Skull and the heavy prosthetic they placed on Hugo Weaving still was pretty silly looking, however, making him one of many weak villains in the MCU. **3.25/5**



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